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Fast Track Career Transformation
For Corning's Overseas Executives:
Sponsors' Perspectives

Corning Incorporated has turned to EMTM to cultivate two Japan-based executives who possess strong technical skills and multi-cultural leadership potential.

In each instance, the diversified technology company obtained an added benefit by posting these executives at its headquarters in Corning, N.Y. during the two-year program. According to Thomas Capek, Director of Division Engineering, Display Technology, "This accelerates the career path for our internationally-located employees, and allows us to accomplish several goals at once: we advance an individual's technical and business skills, immerse that executive in our corporate culture where our technology centers are located, and provide exposure to opportunities at our corporate headquarters."

You become a stakeholder

Corning's sponsorship of executives in EMTM wins a strong endorsement from Peter Bocko, Division Vice President and Director, Commercial Technology Display Group. "The investment in tuition and travel is a pittance when you consider the higher loyalty of participating employees and their broadened skills and perspective," says Bocko. "Sponsorship allows you to extract immediate value from the training and direct the trajectory of the person through the program. You become a stakeholder in what types of skills they'll be learning and in selecting class projects that provide an immediate business benefit. The follow up to EMTM should be that the person goes to a new job to apply the skills they've learned."

Upon completion of EMTM in 2002, Lori J. Hamilton was promoted from Tokyo-based positions in technology and product development for Corning to Marketing Manager for Asia. "Typically it's hard for someone from a technology function to shift into a marketing function with instant credibility," says Bocko, her supervisor at the time. "But Lori was immediately able to stand on her own two feet in arguing the esoterica of commercial strategy with the best of them. She hit the ground running with state of the art marketing and commercial analysis skills."

By mid-2005 Hamilton was named manager of Worldwide Product Engineering for the firm's Display Division. "It would have been much more difficult to make that functional jump without my EMTM training," says Hamilton, who is fluent in Japanese. "It gave me a much broader perspective — not just professionally but also personally — in terms of what's important to me and what I aspire to become."

Putting new skills to use early on

Even with just one year of EMTM under his belt, Corning executive Jorge Fukuda, (EMTM '06), has already put his new skills to use. He recently advised senior Corning executives on a significant investment in a new proprietary technology for display glass manufacturing. According to Capek, his supervisor, "With his EMTM training, he was able to articulate why the investment was necessary from a technology perspective, and also the payback in how this would support our business model. He was absolutely successful."

A third generation Japanese native of Brazil (his grandparents emigrated there from Japan), Fukuda has worked for Corning in Kakegawa, Japan for fourteen years. There, he progressed through operations and manufacturing positions, culminating with oversight for the manufacturing process for finishing precision flat glass for laptop displays. "So far, I have learned two cultures of management — in Brazil and in Japan. Now I want to understand how U.S. executives make decisions and analyze business challenges," says Fukuda.

During the two years he was enrolled in EMTM, Fukuda was a project manager for Corning, serving as a liaison between research and development, at the firm's headquarters, and sites where Corning's precision flat glass displays are manufactured. According to Fukuda, "The strength of EMTM versus an MBA is that even when you are in a pure management position you're making technology- related decisions. You have to consider: are we using the right manufacturing processes, is there another technology that's cheaper? EMTM allows you to make those kinds of decisions, and helps you identify the best possible outcome for a complex situation."

For people with ambition... for companies assessing how they do business

As Corning develops a track record with EMTM, the value of the program relative to other internal and external career development programs used by Corning is emerging. Bocko recommends it with a caveat: "It's only for people who have ambition, extraordinary energy, strong technical skills, and close communication with a boss who can take something off their plate to make this happen."

Bocko adds, "I would especially recommend EMTM for companies in high technology areas who are assessing their historic way of doing business. It used to be that companies like Corning would grow their leaders internally and general managers would emerge from a finite number of job progressions. This program helps us to gain leadership with more of an external perspective and more nimble people in terms of the globalization of technology and business. EMTM will become increasingly recognized as a tool for career development. It's a valuable opportunity to learn about the way commerce and technology is changing."



Lori J. Hamilton, EMTM'02 (L) and Jorge Fukuda, EMTM'06 (C) with Lori's supervising sponsor at Corning, Peter Bocko (R).

“The investment in tuition and travel is a pittance when you consider the higher loyalty of participating employees and their broadened skills and perspective. Sponsorship allows you to extract immediate value from the training and direct the trajectory of the person through the program. You become a stakeholder in what types of skills they'll be learning and in selecting class projects that provide an immediate business benefit.”

Peter Bocko
Division VP and Director,
Commercial Technology
Display Group
Corning Incorporated

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